z-bot:

hannahmcgill:

New large print, ‘Ptempest in a Pteacup’, for Awesome Con! If you’re in Washington, DC this weekend, drop by. I’ll be at table Q8 with my awesome friend, Sarah Schanze.

I’ll be touting RAWR! Dinosaur Friends while she’s going to show off Thistil Mistil Kistil. It’s going to be so fun! :D

I thought dinosaur friends were the best thing ever, but then this happened. BUT it is a subset of dinosaur friends, so I guess dinosaur friends can still be the best thing ever.

Yes, the ‘Dinosaurs on the Internet’ series evolved into ‘RAWR! Dinosaur Friends’, so all the full-color portraits are definitely part of RAWR! Dinosaur Friends. I hope that clears things up.

New large print, ‘Ptempest in a Pteacup’, for Awesome Con! If you’re in Washington, DC this weekend, drop by. I’ll be at table Q8 with my awesome friend, Sarah Schanze.

I’ll be touting RAWR! Dinosaur Friends while she’s going to show off Thistil Mistil Kistil. It’s going to be so fun! :D

ancientpeoples:

Rock crystal 14 sided die

1st-2nd Century AD

Roma Imperial

(Source: The British Museum)

Et tu, Owlbear?

Started a scratch board project for Awesome Con.

More icons yay. More icons yay.

blujayonthewing:

rawrdinosaurfriends:

Snarfl! Gastornis likely snacked on leaves and grass, according to fresh research. Which of these creatures makes the best theoretical pet?

If you have sent a question or a reader response recently, never fear, I’ve got them and they’ll show up eventually.

Website | Twitter | Ask

But why that huge, crushing beak for leaves and grass? It seems pretty structurally similar to parrots’ beaks, which allow them to crack hard nuts and stone fruit pits, among other things.

Great question and observation. I am far and away not an expert, either. When I made the comic, I needed a food that both a Terror Bird and a Tiny Adorable Pleistocene Horse could conceivably eat. Generic leaves seemed like a good ambiguous middle-ground food, edible to both possessors and non-possessors of gigantic nutcracker beaks.

If anybody wants to weigh in on this, I’m very interested!

Been hard at work on stuff (Trust me, the relative silence is a good thing.) Some icons and cuteness in the meantime!

ewilloughby:

This incredibly cool new study by Gossi et al, published today in PLOSone, has researched whether chickens walk differently if they have a long, heavy tail, reminiscent of the type of tail present in non-avian dinosaurs. Giving them such a tail artificially (while controlling for weight) actually changes their gait significantly, giving them more hip-driven locomotion and less knee-driven as in modern birds. Check out the paper, it’s open-access.
From the abstract:

Birds still share many traits with their dinosaur ancestors, making them the best living group to reconstruct certain aspects of non-avian theropod biology. Bipedal, digitigrade locomotion and parasagittal hindlimb movement are some of those inherited traits. Living birds, however, maintain an unusually crouched hindlimb posture and locomotion powered by knee flexion, in contrast to the inferred primitive condition of non-avian theropods: more upright posture and limb movement powered by femur retraction. Such functional differences, which are associated with a gradual, anterior shift of the centre of mass in theropods along the bird line, make the use of extant birds to study non-avian theropod locomotion problematic. Here we show that, by experimentally manipulating the location of the centre of mass in living birds, it is possible to recreate limb posture and kinematics inferred for extinct bipedal dinosaurs. Chickens raised wearing artificial tails, and consequently with more posteriorly located centre of mass, showed a more vertical orientation of the femur during standing and increased femoral displacement during locomotion. Our results support the hypothesis that gradual changes in the location of the centre of mass resulted in more crouched hindlimb postures and a shift from hip-driven to knee-driven limb movements through theropod evolution. This study suggests that, through careful experimental manipulations during the growth phase of ontogeny, extant birds can potentially be used to gain important insights into previously unexplored aspects of bipedal non-avian theropod locomotion.


Man, if I didn’t know any better, I’d say those were gifs made from an episode of Look Around You. ewilloughby:

This incredibly cool new study by Gossi et al, published today in PLOSone, has researched whether chickens walk differently if they have a long, heavy tail, reminiscent of the type of tail present in non-avian dinosaurs. Giving them such a tail artificially (while controlling for weight) actually changes their gait significantly, giving them more hip-driven locomotion and less knee-driven as in modern birds. Check out the paper, it’s open-access.
From the abstract:

Birds still share many traits with their dinosaur ancestors, making them the best living group to reconstruct certain aspects of non-avian theropod biology. Bipedal, digitigrade locomotion and parasagittal hindlimb movement are some of those inherited traits. Living birds, however, maintain an unusually crouched hindlimb posture and locomotion powered by knee flexion, in contrast to the inferred primitive condition of non-avian theropods: more upright posture and limb movement powered by femur retraction. Such functional differences, which are associated with a gradual, anterior shift of the centre of mass in theropods along the bird line, make the use of extant birds to study non-avian theropod locomotion problematic. Here we show that, by experimentally manipulating the location of the centre of mass in living birds, it is possible to recreate limb posture and kinematics inferred for extinct bipedal dinosaurs. Chickens raised wearing artificial tails, and consequently with more posteriorly located centre of mass, showed a more vertical orientation of the femur during standing and increased femoral displacement during locomotion. Our results support the hypothesis that gradual changes in the location of the centre of mass resulted in more crouched hindlimb postures and a shift from hip-driven to knee-driven limb movements through theropod evolution. This study suggests that, through careful experimental manipulations during the growth phase of ontogeny, extant birds can potentially be used to gain important insights into previously unexplored aspects of bipedal non-avian theropod locomotion.


Man, if I didn’t know any better, I’d say those were gifs made from an episode of Look Around You.

ewilloughby:

This incredibly cool new study by Gossi et al, published today in PLOSone, has researched whether chickens walk differently if they have a long, heavy tail, reminiscent of the type of tail present in non-avian dinosaurs. Giving them such a tail artificially (while controlling for weight) actually changes their gait significantly, giving them more hip-driven locomotion and less knee-driven as in modern birds. Check out the paper, it’s open-access.

From the abstract:

Birds still share many traits with their dinosaur ancestors, making them the best living group to reconstruct certain aspects of non-avian theropod biology. Bipedal, digitigrade locomotion and parasagittal hindlimb movement are some of those inherited traits. Living birds, however, maintain an unusually crouched hindlimb posture and locomotion powered by knee flexion, in contrast to the inferred primitive condition of non-avian theropods: more upright posture and limb movement powered by femur retraction. Such functional differences, which are associated with a gradual, anterior shift of the centre of mass in theropods along the bird line, make the use of extant birds to study non-avian theropod locomotion problematic. Here we show that, by experimentally manipulating the location of the centre of mass in living birds, it is possible to recreate limb posture and kinematics inferred for extinct bipedal dinosaurs. Chickens raised wearing artificial tails, and consequently with more posteriorly located centre of mass, showed a more vertical orientation of the femur during standing and increased femoral displacement during locomotion. Our results support the hypothesis that gradual changes in the location of the centre of mass resulted in more crouched hindlimb postures and a shift from hip-driven to knee-driven limb movements through theropod evolution. This study suggests that, through careful experimental manipulations during the growth phase of ontogeny, extant birds can potentially be used to gain important insights into previously unexplored aspects of bipedal non-avian theropod locomotion.

Man, if I didn’t know any better, I’d say those were gifs made from an episode of Look Around You.

(via thetrollingchaos)

killdeercheer:

rawrdinosaurfriends:

The joke is I don’t even know what ‘cladistics’ are, just that my biology/paleo friends constantly complain about them.

Website | Twitter | Ask

It’s funny I’m actually writing about whale origins for this essay contest :D

Excellent! I hope you do well. :)